Mohammed was a prophet of great wisdom who devised a test to find out which rats are Jews and which are not

(8) Narrated Abu Huraira: The Prophet said, “A group of Israelites were lost. Nobody knows what they did. But I do not see them except that they were cursed and changed into rats, for if you put the milk of a she-camel in front of a rat, it will not drink it, but if the milk of a sheep is put in front of it, it will drink it.” I told this to Ka’b who asked me, “Did you hear it from the Prophet ?” I said, “Yes.” Ka’b asked me the same question several times.; I said to Ka’b. “Do I read the Torah? (i.e. I tell you this from the Prophet.)”  (Book #54, Hadith #524)

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5 Responses to Mohammed was a prophet of great wisdom who devised a test to find out which rats are Jews and which are not

  1. θ says:

    The Jewish mystics happened to believe in a transmigration of souls, but not as much as Hindustan incarnation to the next life. The terms such as dybbukim, mazzikim, mazzakim, kesilim, sei’irim, sheddim, and ruhot from Jewish writings showed that they believed in such lycanthropy and transmigration of soul into animals.
    Daniel 4:33 illustrates a quick process how Nebuchadnezzar suffers either physical or clinical lycanthrop, from a man to the beast, having claws and feathers, even behaving like an ox, for several years.

    http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/dibbuk-dybbuk
    Later, an explanation common among other peoples was added, namely that some of the dibbukim are the spirits of dead persons who were not laid to rest and thus became *demons. This idea (also common in medieval Christianity) combined with the doctrine of *gilgul (“transmigration of the soul”) in the 16th century and became widespread and accepted by large segments of the Jewish population, together with the belief in dibbukim.
    They were generally considered to be souls which, on account of the enormity of their sins, were not even allowed to transmigrate and as “denuded spirits” they sought refuge in the bodies of living persons.
    The entry of a dibbuk into a person was a sign of his having committed a secret sin which opened a door for the dibbuk.
    The power to exorcise dibbukim was given to ba’alei shem or accomplished Ḥasidim. They exorcised the dibbuk from the body which was bound by it and simultaneously redeemed the soul by providing a tikkun (“restoration”) for him, either by transmigration or by causing the dibbuk to enter hell.

    http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/demons-and-demonology
    Although these statements refer to Erez Israel, the Jerusalem Talmud is markedly free from demonology, and in fact mentions only three general names for them – mazzikim, shedim, and ruhot.
    Psalm 91 is called “the Psalm of [protection against harmful] visitations.” Moses is stated to have recited it when he ascended Mount Sinai “because of his fear of mazzikim… and angels of destruction.” It is enjoined to be recited “because the whole world is full of evil spirits and mazzikim” (Tanh., Mishpatim, end) and the midrashic interpretations of this Psalm are a veritable treasure store of demonology lore (e.g., Mid. Ps. 91; Tanh., Mishpatim, end; Num. R. 12:3–4).

  2. θ says:

    In Hadith, Prophet Muhammad assures that both apes and swine were created long time before the evil men were cursed to be apes and swine, and they can’t breed any descendant.
    Muslim Book 33, Hadith 6438
    Abdullah reported that mention was made before him about monkeys, and Mis’ar (one of the narrators) said: I think that (the narrator) also (made a mention) of the swine, which had suffered metamorphosis. Thereupon he (the Holy Prophet) said: Verily, Allah did not cause the race of those which suffered metamorphosis to grow or they were not survived by young ones. Monkeys and swine had been in existence even before (the metamorphosis of the human beings).

  3. θ says:

    The Jewish mystics happened to believe in a transmigration of souls, but not as much as Hindustan incarnation to the next life. The terms such as dybbukim, mazzikim, mazzakim, kesilim, sei’irim, sheddim, and ruhot from Jewish writings showed that they believed in such lycanthropy and transmigration of soul into animals.
    Daniel 4:33 illustrates a quick process how Nebuchadnezzar suffers either physical or clinical lycanthrop, from a man to the beast, having claws and feathers, even behaving like an ox, for several years.

    http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/dibbuk-dybbuk
    Later, an explanation common among other peoples was added, namely that some of the dibbukim are the spirits of dead persons who were not laid to rest and thus became *demons. This idea (also common in medieval Christianity) combined with the doctrine of *gilgul (“transmigration of the soul”) in the 16th century and became widespread and accepted by large segments of the Jewish population, together with the belief in dibbukim.
    They were generally considered to be souls which, on account of the enormity of their sins, were not even allowed to transmigrate and as “denuded spirits” they sought refuge in the bodies of living persons.
    The entry of a dibbuk into a person was a sign of his having committed a secret sin which opened a door for the dibbuk.
    The power to exorcise dibbukim was given to Ba’alei Shem or accomplished Hasidim. They exorcised the dibbuk from the body which was bound by it and simultaneously redeemed the soul by providing a tikkun (“restoration”) for him, either by transmigration or by causing the dibbuk to enter hell.

    http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/demons-and-demonology
    Although these statements refer to Erez Israel, the Jerusalem Talmud is markedly free from demonology, and in fact mentions only three general names for them – mazzikim, shedim, and ruhot.
    Psalm 91 is called “the Psalm of [protection against harmful] visitations.” Moses is stated to have recited it when he ascended Mount Sinai “because of his fear of mazzikim… and angels of destruction.” It is enjoined to be recited “because the whole world is full of evil spirits and mazzikim” (Tanh., Mishpatim, end) and the midrashic interpretations of this Psalm are a veritable treasure store of demonology lore (e.g., Mid. Ps. 91; Tanh., Mishpatim, end; Num. R. 12:3–4).

  4. θ says:

    The Jewish mystics happened to believe in a transmigration of souls, but not as much as Hindustan incarnation to the next life. The terms such as dybbukim, mazzikim, mazzakim, kesilim, sei’irim, sheddim, and ruhot from Jewish writings showed that they believed in such lycanthropy and transmigration of soul into animals.
    Daniel 4:33 illustrates a quick process how Nebuchadnezzar suffers either physical or clinical lycanthrop, from a man to the beast, having claws and feathers, even behaving like an ox, for several years.

  5. θ says:

    From jewishvirtuallibrary on dybbukim and mazzakim:
    Later, an explanation common among other peoples was added, namely that some of the dibbukim are the spirits of dead persons who were not laid to rest and thus became *demons. This idea (also common in medieval Christianity) combined with the doctrine of *gilgul (“transmigration of the soul”) in the 16th century and became widespread and accepted by large segments of the Jewish population, together with the belief in dibbukim.
    They were generally considered to be souls which, on account of the enormity of their sins, were not even allowed to transmigrate and as “denuded spirits” they sought refuge in the bodies of living persons.
    The entry of a dibbuk into a person was a sign of his having committed a secret sin which opened a door for the dibbuk.
    The power to exorcise dibbukim was given to Ba’alei Shem or accomplished Hasidim. They exorcised the dibbuk from the body which was bound by it and simultaneously redeemed the soul by providing a tikkun (“restoration”) for him, either by transmigration or by causing the dibbuk to enter hell.

    Although these statements refer to Erez Israel, the Jerusalem Talmud is markedly free from demonology, and in fact mentions only three general names for them – mazzikim, shedim, and ruhot.
    Psalm 91 is called “the Psalm of [protection against harmful] visitations.” Moses is stated to have recited it when he ascended Mount Sinai “because of his fear of mazzikim… and angels of destruction.” It is enjoined to be recited “because the whole world is full of evil spirits and mazzikim” (Tanh., Mishpatim, end) and the midrashic interpretations of this Psalm are a veritable treasure store of demonology lore (e.g., Mid. Ps. 91; Tanh., Mishpatim, end; Num. R. 12:3–4).

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