Jesus commands his disciples to do what in Islam would be considered to be the gravest of sins, the sin of shirk, or associating another person in one’s belief in God

John 14 v

1 Let not your heart be troubled: ye believe in God, believe also in me. 2 In my Father’s house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. 3 And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and receive you unto myself; that where I am, there ye may be also.4 And whither I go ye know, and the way ye know.

After Jesus had healed the man who was blind from birth he asked him if he believed in the Son of God:

Jesus Heals the Man Born Blind

John 9 v

1 And as Jesus passed by, he saw a man which was blind from his birth. 2 And his disciples asked him, saying, Master, who did sin, this man, or his parents, that he was born blind? 3 Jesus answered, Neither hath this man sinned, nor his parents: but that the works of God should be made manifest in him. 4 I must work the works of him that sent me, while it is day: the night cometh, when no man can work. 5 As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.

35 Jesus heard that they had cast him out; and when he had found him, he said unto him, Dost thou believe on the Son of God? 36 He answered and said, Who is he, Lord, that I might believe on him? 37 And Jesus said unto him, Thou hast both seen him, and it is he that talketh with thee. 38 And he said, Lord, I believe. And he worshipped him. 39 And Jesus said, For judgment I am come into this world, that they which see not might see; and that they which see might be made blind.

To be a Christian we must commit the gravest sin possible in the eyes of the islamic religion, and that is to associate the Son of God with God the Father and worship both together as one God.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Jesus commands his disciples to do what in Islam would be considered to be the gravest of sins, the sin of shirk, or associating another person in one’s belief in God

  1. θ says:

    Historical Jesus lived under the severe pagan pressure, as well as writers of Gospel, so they may be forced to say or write the words of Kafir, and they got pardoned to do so, since what matters most is their intent, per Q.16. v.106, Q.33, v.5.

    But, it’s important to note that a permissible condition in the time of Jesus is completely different than today’s Trinitarian’s condition (even since Nicene Council) when there’s no pagan pressure any longer. Hence, when they say “Son of God” without affirming figurative sense of it, they go commit the great offense of making a blasphemous lie against God.

    As far as today’s Christianity is concerned, nobody of the Trinitarians intends to believe in the biological son of God for themselves. But, since they preach the sonship without making any figurative consideration for it, they are guilty of preaching idolatry..

    All humans since Adam must be Mawali (successors, heirs) of Allah. Allah is the sole Protector (Wali) of angels per Q.34, v.41, and the sole Protector of the believers per Q.2, v.257.
    In Islam, there’s a patronymic pattern of the so-called “Mother of Book”, but there’s no such a thing as “Son of the Book”. Also there’s a “figurative son”, namely “Ibn Sabil”. Nevertheless that inanimate patrimony doesn’t incur blasphemy whatsoever.

  2. Tell me, any Muslim out there, why is it necessary for Allah to grant the power of life-giver to Jesus in your koran? what is the reason of it?
    Qur’an Contradiction
    Is Jesus God or Not?
    Therefore, the Quran clearly shows that the Lord Jesus fits the description of God, fulfilling the very criteria which demonstrates that Christ is indeed very God of very God.
    Yet, it is at this precise point that we have a contradiction within the Quran itself. There is no denying that the Quran rejects the Deity of Jesus (cf. 4:171; 5:17, 70-75; 9:30). But, as we just saw, the Quran attributes titles, qualities and functions to Christ which shows that he is indeed God. Other titles given to Christ which affirm his essential Deity include the Word of God and a Spirit from God (cf. 3:39, 45; 4:171).
    A Muslim may say that Jesus was given the ability to create and give life by God, just as the passages themselves state. He didn’t have this ability within himself. This response doesn’t solve the contradiction, but only pushes it a step further.
    Why would God grant Jesus the abilities and characteristics of Deity? Why is God permitting Jesus to perfectly fit the description and fulfill the criteria which places one within the category of God?
    Second, the expression “by God’s permission” doesn’t necessarily mean that Christ was given abilities he did not already have. The statements can be understood in light of the biblical teaching that Christ did nothing on his own initiative, but did everything in perfect union with his Father’s will. (cf. John 5:16-30)
    In other words, the Quranic expression simply implies that Christ only exercised his divine prerogatives in accordance with the decree of God, never acting on his own behest or initiative. It need not deny that Christ always had these divine attributes and characteristics. This becomes all the more likely when we recall that the Quran describes Christ as God’s Word and a Spirit proceeding from God, titles which point to Christ’s divinity and pre-existence.
    Sam Shamoun

  3. θ says:

    “martha_layton says: There is no denying that the Quran rejects the Deity of Jesus (cf. 4:171; 5:17, 70-75; 9:30). But, as we just saw, the Quran attributes titles, qualities and functions to Christ which shows that he is indeed God. Other titles given to Christ which affirm his essential Deity include the Word of God and a Spirit from God (cf. 3:39, 45; 4:171).”

    In Islam, a honor of being a maker is not the same with that of the non-makers, but it doesn’t mean each maker (inventor, author, producer, et cetera) is divine.

    “A Muslim may say that Jesus was given the ability to create and give life by God, just as the passages themselves state. He didn’t have this ability within himself. This response doesn’t solve the contradiction, but only pushes it a step further.”

    A Qur’anic proof that Jesus is not divine is shown in his birth. Being little bit lower than Eve and Adam, Jesus still needs Mary to exist in the world.

    “Why would God grant Jesus the abilities and characteristics of Deity? Why is God permitting Jesus to perfectly fit the description and fulfill the criteria which places one within the category of God?”

    For us Moslems, having a power as the life-giver is not the proof of divinity:
    – A king (supposedly Nimrod) has a power to create life.
    Nimrod is a son of the remnants of Nephilim, he has a demonic power, he is the first rebel of God. Abraham was accredited in Qur’an with a great honor (Quran Q.2, v.258) because he is brave enough to confront a demonic Nimrod (typical of Dajjal) who forced the people to worship him, and apparently it is a reason why Allah commands Abraham to leave Ur and stay in Jerusalem.
    In the Jewish sources, Abraham defeated king Nimrod under the name of “Amraphel” in the war.

    – Moses has the power to resurrect a dead man with a part of body of the slain Heifer (Q.2, v.73).
    – Ezra has the power to resurrect his dead donkey (Q.2, v.259).
    – Moses has a power to bring the quails out of nothing (Q.2, v.57)
    – Moses has the miraculous power to make his rod become a serpent (Q.7, v.107).
    – Elisha has many miracles, one of them is the power of resurrection (Q.38, v.48).

  4. According to Sam Shamoun, Koran shows Jesus is equal to Allah in terms of imparting the life to others.
    //www.reformedapologeticsministries.com/2015/11/the-quran-testifies.html
    To top it off, the Quran employs the very same verb for create which always denotes the creative action of God:
    “The verb khalaqa is found 180 times in the Qur’an and it is always translated, in various languages, with ‘to create.’ With the exception of Q 20:17 (takhluquna ifkan= you invent a lie), it always designates the creative action of God. In 177 cases, the subject of the verb is God, while in the other two cases (3:49 and 5:110) it is Christ. Evidently this could only come from Christians; Muslim tradition, which could not uphold this meaning (the only one attested in the Qur’an), interprets it with the meaning of ‘to fashion, mold.’ Meanwhile, the action of ‘breathing into’ is, in the Bible as in the Qur’an, typical of the creative action of God.
    “Thus the two verbs used in this verse both reflect the divine creative action, and not the human action of a potter, for example, thereby confirming the Christian origin of this verse.” (Samir Khalil Samir, “6. The Theological Christian Influence on the Qur’an – A Reflection,” The Qur’an in its Historical Context, edited by Gabriel Said Reynolds [Routledge Studies in the Qur’an, 2008], p. 146; bold emphasis ours)
    Muslims may object that it was Allah who granted Jesus the ability to possess and impart life to others, which therefore disproves that Christ is equal to him. However, this objection doesn’t help the Muslims but actually makes matters worse, since this means that Allah has taken Jesus to be his partner by conferring upon him specific divine characteristics and functions.
    In other words, this argument essentially means that Allah is guilty of committing shirk since he has granted Christ the right to share in his divine nature and attributes.

  5. θ says:

    “martha_layton says: According to Sam Shamoun, Koran shows Jesus is equal to Allah in terms of imparting the life to others.”

    Rather, Qur’an chooses to bring our simple attention on the birth (creation) of Jesus himself.

    Adam is likened to Jesus, despite a fact that actually Adam is far more superior than Jesus due to Adam’s unique existence without ever experiencing the birth nor having any parent.
    So, Eve should have been less or more equal to Jesus since Eve was “born” out of Adam.

    Thus, in Islam, the ability of imparting the life to others is not as impressive as a greater power of Self-creating.

    Here is the list for the life-givers:
    – A king (supposedly Nimrod) has a power to create life.
    Nimrod is a son of the remnants of Nephilim, he has a demonic power, he is the first rebel of God. Abraham was accredited in Qur’an with a great honor (Quran Q.2, v.258) because he is brave enough to confront a demonic Nimrod (typical of Dajjal) who forced the people to worship him due to his power of imparting the life to the dead ones.
    Apparently it is a reason why Allah commands Abraham to leave Ur Chaldea and stay in Jerusalem.
    In the Jewish sources, Abraham defeated king Nimrod under the name of “Amraphel” in the war.

    – Moses has a power to resurrect a dead man with a part of body of the slain Heifer (Q.2, v.73).
    – Abraham has a power to resurrect the bird from the pieces scattered from all corners (Q.2, v.260).
    – Ezra has a power to resurrect his dead donkey (Q.2, v.259).
    – Moses has a power to bring the quails out of nothing (Q.2, v.57)
    – Moses has a miraculous power to make his rod become a serpent (Q.7, v.107).
    – Adam gives a “birth” to his wife in Eden (Q.2, v.35).
    – Mentor of Moses (Khidr) has a power to give the new life to the dead fish (Q.18, v.61).
    – Elisha has many miracles, one of them is the power of resurrection (Q.38, v.48).

    Notably, the Qur’anic verses from Q.2, v.258 to Q.2, v.260 talk bluntly about the mortal’s power of imparting the life to the dead ones.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.