Jesus clearly states his determination to sacrifice himself for the world. Islam denies that Jesus ever had this intention

John 6 v 47

Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that believeth on me hath everlasting life.

48 I am that bread of life.

49 Your fathers did eat manna in the wilderness, and are dead.

50 This is the bread which cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die.

51 I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my flesh, which I will give for the life of the world.

52 The Jews therefore strove among themselves, saying, How can this man give us his flesh to eat?

53 Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, ye have no life in you.

54 Whoso eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day.

55 For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed.

56 He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him.

57 As the living Father hath sent me, and I live by the Father: so he that eateth me, even he shall live by me.

58 This is that bread which came down from heaven: not as your fathers did eat manna, and are dead: he that eateth of this bread shall live for ever.

59 These things said he in the synagogue, as he taught in Capernaum.

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6 Responses to Jesus clearly states his determination to sacrifice himself for the world. Islam denies that Jesus ever had this intention

  1. θ says:

    One can quickly notice or spot a cheap way of fooling and beguiling in Jesus’ parable when he’s just contradicting his earlier promise “no man will die if eating his flesh” with another promise “I shall raise him at last day”. Logically, a man who does not die will not be raised up from death.
    Jn 6
    50 This is the bread which cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die.54 Whoso eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day.

  2. Anonymous says:

    The Parable of the Bread of Heaven has nothing to do with sins, Jesus doesn’t say that the act of killing (eating or drinking) himself will atone the sins of his killers or his eaters.

  3. θ says:

    Jesus uses his parable of Heavenly Bread to intentionally mislead the Jews and the Trinitarians into the astray, but for his’ true and inner circles (allusion for Moslems) Jesus confirms a fact how his flesh profits *nothing*, not even profitable for one’s atonement of sin whatsoever, hence the crucifixion is in vain.
    Jn 6:63
    It is the spirit that quickeneth; the flesh profiteth nothing: the words that I speak unto you, they are spirit, and they are life.

  4. Anonymous says:

    Neither the Oneness Pentecostals nor the Trinitarians afford to believe that a slain man on the cross is really the unseen second person (or second mode) of the “I am” (Ego Eimi).
    Jn 6:48
    I am that bread of life.
    Jn 6:51
    I am the living bread which came down from heaven:

    If the Pentecostal deity died, who runs the universe for three days?
    If the Trinitarian Son were a man in the flesh of one nature, they turn to be Nestorian heretics.

  5. Anonymous says:

    John 6 of the Bread parable is one of the moot verses arguing for the Trinity. Rarely the Trinitarian apologists employ John 6. The chapter is one of the Gospel’s section where usually the Trinitarians put a “you shouldn’t go there” sticker, one of the reasons is absurdity.

    John 6 is one of the silliest chapters against Jesus’ own credibility – if we employ the Trinitarian interpretation – because therein it is inferred a suggestion how Jesus is found to *incite* the Jews to kill him first, which is an euphemism of eating him.
    Let’s suppose that Jesus’ invitation of eating his flesh and drinking his blood is just a parable, yet nevertheless he is found guilty of inducing those Jews to kill himself (at least in the Trinitarian belief). That makes him sin as a murderer.

    Cannibalism is evil indeed, but Jesus’ act of instigating the Jews for killing himself is a more greater evil, even against the Ten Commandments.

  6. Anonymous says:

    Rarely the Trinitarian apologists employ John 6, one of the reasons is absurdity.

    In Lev 17:14 Moses tells clearly the main reason why Jehovah forbids the consumption of bloods of the sacrificial animals – despite it’s holy and cleansing the Temple from impurity – because the blood (no matter how holy it is) is not to cleanse the sinful soul within the sinner’s body.

    Now, weirdly in John 6 Jesus makes the Jews go against Jehovah by inviting them to consume his bloods for a “same exact reason” which Jehovah forbids them of, that is to cleanse their sinful soul. How absurd.
    Lev 17:14
    For it is the life of all flesh; the blood of it is for the life thereof: therefore I said unto the children of Israel, Ye shall eat the blood of no manner of flesh: for the life of all flesh is the blood thereof: whosoever eateth it shall be cut off.

    Otherwise, logically, if the alleged “atoning” blood of Jesus were able to cleanse the sins within one’s soul, the same sinner should have been allowed to consume the “atoning” bloods of animal sacrifices as well for purification of their souls, but in facts Jehovah forbids it.

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