US-based Muslims divorce their wives in India using WhatsApp, a post from JihadWatch.org, with comments

Both women were divorced unilaterally. “Hussaini, who lives in the US sent three words over WhatsApp – Talaq, Talaq, Talaq – and completed the process of divorce.”

That was all that Islamic law required. If, however, Heena Fatima had sought a divorce, she would have had to go before a Sharia court and convince it that she had good reasons for the divorce.

Feminists remain silent about this institutionalized inequality.

“Hyderabad: 2 Muslim women divorced over WhatsApp by US-based husbands,” IndiaToday, March 4, 2017 (thanks to The Religion of Peace):

Two Muslim women in Hyderabad have been divorced over WhatsApp by their husbands living in the US. The two women have lodged complaint with the police.

Two divorces in a Hyderabad family have ignited the debate over triple talaq. Two women living in Hyderabad were divorced over WhatsApp by their respective husbands.

The husbands are brothers, who decided to divorce their wives one after another over the mobile chatting app.

Heena Fatima was divorced by her husband Syed Fayazuddin Hussain in a few weeks ago. They had married in February, 2013.

Four years later Hussaini, who lives in the US sent three words over WhatsApp – Talaq, Talaq, Talaq – and completed the process of divorce. Later, he also sent the divorce papers from the US.

In the second case, Mehreen Noor, married to Hussaini’s brother Mohammad Abdul Aqeel, was divorced by her husband over WhatsApp. Mehreen received a WhatsApp message from Akheel that she had been divorced.

Having been divorced unilaterally and without seeking consent, Heena and Mehreen have decided to fight back.

Heena has been quoted in reports as saying, “Sharia law lets you divorce me, but who is going to look after our children? Doesn’t Sharia law ask of you to take care of your children?”

On the other hand, Mehreen said that she was not even sure about the name of her husband at the time of their wedding. She has been quoted as saying, “I found out after marriage that my husband’s real name is Usman Qureshi. Now, without citing any reason, he has sent me divorce.”

“They (the two brothers) have made marriage a joke,” said Mehreen….

UK: Sharia courts operating beyond reach of British law and oppressing women

COMMENTS

  1. Mac-101 says

    March 5, 2017 at 1:58 pm

    Who says these Islamic Barbarians are stuck in the 7th century? Through High Tech they eliminated the need for divorce LAUYERS. LOL!

  2. Lucia Bartoli says

    March 5, 2017 at 2:45 pm

    Well divorce means no more Islamist children from at least these two. I wish saying 3 words from US to the brothers (and all the rest) would make THEM go away!

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to US-based Muslims divorce their wives in India using WhatsApp, a post from JihadWatch.org, with comments

  1. θ says:

    Dowry is essential in Islamic marriage. Islam values the body of woman from the amount of her dowry that serves as her financial guarantee for the rest of her life. Don’t blame any potential womaniser in this world if woman herself doesn’t tie him with a written promise which could make him broke. Respect needs to be earned. A treaty could be a silly joke if it is made without any penalty for violating the terms.

  2. θ says:

    A marriage which doesn’t have a dowry as Islam establishes – including dowry in the form of written promise for the marital payment that could damage the husband’s economy – is like a silly free sex, or the one night stand, or a prostitution.
    //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahr
    The mahr amount given to the bride at the signing of the marriage contract is called a ‘muqaddam (lit. hastened, advanced), and the portion that is promised but deferred is called a mu’ajjal (lit. deferred, delayed). A deferred promise to pay does not make the full amount of the mahr any less legally required.[5] There are differences between the nature of mahr, definition of proper contract and conditions of enforceability depending on the regional fiqh and school of Islamic jurisprudence.[6]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s