Three Quran Verses Every Christian Should Know ( David Wood )

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3 Responses to Three Quran Verses Every Christian Should Know ( David Wood )

  1. θ says:

    The simple purpose of Q.5, v.47 is the invalidation of both the writer’s unnecessary commentaries and the Pauline epistles, since they are not the verbatim Gospel coming from Jesus’ own words that contain the eternal life.

    The term “Gospel” in Islam actually refers to the Arabic Gospel at the hands of the 7th century Arabs – such as what Ibn Ishaq reports as Injil of Yuhannis – as well as the verbatim Gospel, that is what we know nowadays as the “Red Letter Gospel”, plus what the scholars consider as the “earliest” manuscripts.
    Hence, verses John 20:28, John 1:1, John 1:14, John 3:16, Luke 1:35, and Matt 28:19 are not what Qur’an calls the Gospel.
    The earliest manuscripts of Gospels do not contain today’s Trinitarian version of Mt 28:19 but rather a shorter version Mt. 28:19: Go ye, and make disciples of all nations in my name. Moslems believe that the most authentic verses of Gospels are the earliest written ones.

    //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_letter_edition
    Red letter edition Bibles are those in which words spoken by Jesus, commonly only while he was on the Earth, are printed in red ink.

    Qur’an is detailed and explained by the Sunnah as Q.41, v.44 responds the demand of the Arabs over a necessary Qur’anic commentary, such as “Sallu” of Allah, that is in the form His mercy of love, as well as narrative verses which are started by the command of making more elaboration further, namely “illustrate it”, “remind it” (Q.7, v.176, Q.19, v.56).
    Q.41, v.44 And if We had sent it Qur’an in a foreign language other than Arabic, they would have said: Why are not its verses explained in detail? Isn’t foreign language and an Arab? Say: It is for those who believe, a guide and a healing. And as for those who disbelieve, there is heaviness in their ears, and it is blindness for them. They are those who are called from a place far away.

    Qur’an also compares its style with a literary pattern of the Bible that has guided the previous believers, such as the use of alphabets – such as Nun, Qaf, Sad – when opening a verse or chapter without giving any meaning at all, except that for a basic teaching of alphabet.

  2. θ says:

    This is a trick the Christian apologists used to make when debating the authenticity of the NT Book:
    (i) On the contents of Matt 28:19 they just refer to what the early apologists say rather than what is written on the real manuscripts or on the papyri.
    (ii) Using less than a half surviving manuscripts (having missing verses) coming from 2nd century to make a marking-up generalisation that the “additional” verses contained in latter manuscripts *must be* also contained by the 2nd century manuscripts – by adssuming them as exactly the genuine missing verses – without any dispute.

    For example, Manuscript P105 comes from 6th century (year 500s) containing Matthew 27-28, yet it only has the verses 2-5 for Matt 28, meaning just 25% of today’s 20 verses. Hence from where do the verses Matt 28:6-20 come? Curiously.

    //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_New_Testament_papyri
    “Early” manuscripts are manuscripts from the fourth century or earlier. Roughly half of the papyri are “early”. Some manuscripts contain content from more than one New Testament book, so the numbers above do not directly correspond to the total number of manuscripts.[10]
    NT Book — Total — Early
    Matthew –23 — 11
    Mark — 3 — 2
    Luke — 10 — 6
    John — 30 — 19
    //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papyrus_105
    Papyrus 105 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), designated by P105, is a copy of the New Testament in Greek. It is a papyrus manuscript of the Gospel of Matthew. The surviving texts of Matthew are verses 27:62-64; 28:2-5, they are in a fragmentary condition. The manuscript has been paleographically estimated to date back to the 5th or 6th century CE.[1]

  3. θ says:

    Here are tricks the Christian apologists used to produce when debating the authenticity of the NT Book:
    (i) On the contents of Matt 28:19 they just refer to what the early Christian apologists say rather than what is written on the real manuscripts or appeared on the papyri during two centuries CE.

    Moreover, mostly the verses of the Gospel just come from “reconstruction” derived from the quotations of early Christian apologists rather than the real evidence of the written manuscripts on papyri.

    The existing NT manuscripts till 200 CE:
    P52, 125 CE: John 18:31-33; 18:37-38 (5 verses)
    P90, 150 CE: John 18:36-19:1; 19:1-7 (12 verses)
    P104, 150 CE: Matthew 21:34-37; 21:43,45 (6 verses)
    P98, 150 CE: Revelation 1 (20 verses)
    P75, 175-225 CE: Luke 3-18,22-24; John 1-15
    P4, 175-250 CE: Luke 1-6
    P21, 200 CE: Matthew 12 (50 verses)
    P32, 200 CE: Titus 1:11-15; 2:3-8 (11 verses)
    P46, 200 CE: Rom 5-6,8-16; 1 Cor; 2Cor; Gal; Eph; Php; Col; 1 Th; Heb

    For example, Matthew’s Gospel until 2nd century just consists of 56 verses, hence how could such a little amount give a large authentication for entire verses of Matthew’s Gospel in the 4th century codices?

    (ii) The apologist’s tactic of generalising. They are just using less than a half surviving manuscripts from 2nd century (just half a total) to make a marking-up “generalisation” for the credence of later codices. It means the larger verses from 4th-5th uncial codices borrow (or snatch precisely) authentication from a *smaller fragments* of the 2nd century manuscripts.

    //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_New_Testament_papyri
    “Early” manuscripts are manuscripts from the fourth century or earlier. Roughly half of the papyri are “Early”. Some manuscripts contain content from more than one New Testament book, so the numbers above do not directly correspond to the total number of manuscripts.[10]
    NT Book — Total — Early
    .Matthew – 23 — 11
    .Mark — 3 — 2
    .Luke — 10 — 6
    .John — 30 — 19

    (iii) Making a blind-supposing. The apologists claim that whatever verses added by the later codices of 4th and 5th century must be as exactly genuine as the missing or non-existing verses of manuscripts or papyri of the 2nd century.
    Christians just argue – backward and circular fallacy – that the “additional” verses contained in later (4th-5th century) codices *must be* also contained by the previous 2nd century manuscripts simply because the later codices contain the surviving verses of 2nd century. In other words, the latter determines contents of the previous in absurd way.

    Versions of Matt 28:19.
    Matthew chapter 28 (consisting 20 verses) does not appear in any earlier written manuscript on papyri. But, then suddenly the chapter 28 of Matthew’s Gospel just pops up from nowhere on the 4th century codices. Hence, who invents them?

    Importantly, one particular verse of Matt 28:19 just came out from “reconstruction” of the quotations of early Trinitarian apologists who talk about the method of baptism. Nevertheless, there’s also a shorter version from Eusebius (using “in my name” instead), as well as other codices of 5th century that do not have Matt 28:19 (considered as textual lacunae), such as codex of Ephraemi and codex of Bezae.
    Also fragment of manuscript P105 – that comes from 6th century, hence it is no longer authentic – contains a particular Matthew 27-28, but it only has four verses (2-5) for Matt 28, meaning just 25% of today’s 20 verses. All these facts just invalidate the authentication of today’s Matt 28:19.
    //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Codex_Ephraemi_Rescriptus
    Lacunae
    Gospel of Matthew: 1:1–2; 5:15–7:5; 17:26–18:28; 22:21–23:17; 24:10–45; 25:30–26:22; 27:11–46; 28:15-fin.;
    //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Codex_Bezae
    Lacunae
    Matthew 1:1-20, 6:20-9:2, 27:2-12; John 1:16-3:26; Acts 8:29-10:14, 21:2-10, 21:16-18, 22:10-20, 22:29-End
    //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papyrus_105
    Papyrus 105 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), designated by P105, is a copy of the New Testament in Greek. It is a papyrus manuscript of the Gospel of Matthew. The surviving texts of Matthew are verses 27:62-64; 28:2-5, they are in a fragmentary condition. The manuscript has been paleographically estimated to date back to the 5th or 6th century CE.[1]

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