Did Jesus Command Christians to Kill in Luke 19:27? A video from Answering Muslims

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14 Responses to Did Jesus Command Christians to Kill in Luke 19:27? A video from Answering Muslims

  1. Anonymous says:

    Jesus’ describing parable turns to be something as prescribing in Rom 13, which is against the rebels whom a legalistic king should need to label as “criminal” first. A more comprehensive readings of the NT Bible would come to a conclusion that Jesus was proposing his followers to behave like a vengeful king in his parable against “criminal”.The political point Jesus’ parable conveys is that any crime against a kingdom’s law is indeed a capital offence.
    Thru Paul, the NT Bible has justified that death is a legalistic penalty for such a thing as the crime of rebellion.
    Rom 13
    4 For he is the minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain: for he is the minister of God, a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil.5 Wherefore ye must needs be subject, not only for wrath, but also for conscience sake.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Just as Jesus prescribes his followers to not be rebellious, he prescriptively them to behave like a legalistic king when confronting the criminals.

  3. θ says:

    Prescriptively, Jesus allows any ruler, who happens to get a power over the people, to rule them with an iron policy for subjugation, penalising exertion to enforce control and obedience, along with an executing authority that Jesus describes physically as “breaking a potter to shivers”.
    Rev 2
    26 And he that overcometh, and keepeth my works unto the end, to him will I give power over the nations:27 And he shall rule them with a rod of iron; as the vessels of a potter shall they be broken to shivers: even as I received of my Father.

  4. θ says:

    According to Romans 13, every ruler is practically a “minister” of God receiving an ordination of God. Hence in the Trinitarian theology, every human rulers – including tyrants, Caesars, and caliphs, even popes – happen to be ministers of God over nation, even as Rev 2:27 correlating the political power is something of privilege “as I received of my Father”.

    Jesus is very much prescriptive with violence, that such a ruler representing himself should rule the people with a rod of iron, as far as as the vessels of a potter shall they be broken to shivers.

  5. Anonymous says:

    Romans 13 is considered as a huge shift of doctrine. How could the fallible and vulnerable humans be trusted to exert a violent reprisal, with a rod of iron, to execute wrath, without fearing a possibility of their abuses of power?

  6. madmanna says:

    Caliphs are also flawed as Sharia is flawed too much in favour of Muslims.

  7. θ says:

    You hate the terminology because it happens to be in Arabic?
    Shari’ah is synonymous with what a terminology Paul coined as “ordained of God”.
    Caliph is synonymous with “minister of God” to whom honor is due.
    Rom 13:1
    Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God.

    Where does the slogan “vengeance belongs to God” when Paul needs otherwise to justify his version of caliph?
    Rom 13:4
    For he is the minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain: for he is the minister of God, a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil.

  8. Anonymous says:

    In Psalms 110:5 of the Masoretic version, Jehovah turns to sit back – at the right hand of the Messiah – meaning that Jehovah is now sitting to see how the Messiah and his kings (as signified by the phrase “through kings” under Messiah, per Rev 2:27, Rev 1:6) shall judge, crush down, and wound the heathens, after giving the Messiah a respite.
    Making a person “sit at one’s right hand” means letting that person do nothing at all except watching and witnessing.
    Ps 110
    5 The LORD at thy right hand shall strike through kings in the day of his wrath. 6 He shall judge among the heathen, he shall fill the places with the dead bodies; he shall wound the heads over many countries.7 He shall drink of the brook in the way: therefore shall he lift up the head.
    Rev 1:6
    And hath made us kings and priests unto God and his Father; to him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen.
    Rev 2:27
    And he shall rule them with a rod of iron; as the vessels of a potter shall they be broken to shivers: even as I received of my Father.

    Previously, in Psalms 110:1 it is the Messiah who firstly was taken up to sit down at the right hand of Jehovah, on purpose to give Messiah a respite, as well as a guidance for his future mission of how to defeat the enemies. Remember, Jesus was just taught how to be a “pacifist servant” (that is, as High Priest of Melchizedek during the time of Abram) at the first ministry.
    Ps 110
    1 The LORD said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool.4 The LORD hath sworn, and will not repent, Thou art a priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek.

    In Psalms 110:1, Jehovah ought to demonstrate a preliminary lesson how to make the enemies a footstool to the sitting Messiah. It needs a condition where the Messiah watches at Jehovah’s right hand.
    But then, in Psalms 110:5, it is a turn of Jehovah eventually to sit back, to watch how the Messiah and his kings implement directly – what Messiah had learned from Jehovah – how to punish the heathens.

  9. Anonymous says:

    In other words, the verses of Psalms 110:1-5 do not prove the divinity of the Messiah, rather support the Unitarian and Jewish insistence on a rigid consistency of Monotheism in the Tanach.

  10. θ says:

    In the Trinitarian interpretation, there’s a dishonest change from “My right hand” (Jehovah is the only speaker here) to suddenly “Thy right hand” (somewhat it becomes David’s saying). Hence, the Trinitarian reading of Psalms 110:1-5 is very odd, moot, a twist of context, and far inconsistent.

  11. θ says:

    Jesus cannot be called a *son* of Father so long as he wrongly called his son “Lord”. It is similar to a relation between David and Jesus, that the Messiah cannot be David’s son as long as he calls him “Lord”.
    Matt 22:45
    If David then call him Lord, how is he his son?

    Heb 1:10
    And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands:

    Moreover, if the Son were a maker of both the earth and the Heaven (instead of a medium), then the Son must have been the Father himself, and as consequence the Trinity is wrong. It turns to the heresy of Modalism.
    Isa 64:8
    But now, O LORD, thou art our Father; we are the clay, and thou our potter; and we all are the work of thy hand.

    Otherwise, If David were to be a worshiper of his son Jesus in Afterlife, then the Father must have been a worshiper of his son Jesus as well even since the beginning.

    On the contextual continuation of Heb 1:9, the following verse Heb 1:10 must be about God strictly, not Jesus, because:
    (i) Due to the son’s anointment physically and having several fellows biologically, the verse Heb 1:9 must not talk about the Son of God, but rather “Son of Man”.
    As it is utterly impossible to have the Son of Man as maker of heaven, Jesus isn’t that Lord in Heb 1:10.

    (ii) The phrase “Thy God” at the end of verse Heb 1:9 refers to God who anoints Jesus, hence consequently the title “Lord” in Heb 1:10 must be also for God.

  12. Anonymous says:

    Book of Hebrews chapter 1 uses a specific word “And” four times, and the pattern of its usage shows that each verse refers to God consistently, not to Jesus.
    – God brings down the first-begotten.
    Heb 1:6
    And again, when he bringeth in the firstbegotten into the world, he saith, And let all the angels of God worship him.

    – God makes the angels, even converses with them.
    Heb 1:7
    And of the angels he saith, Who maketh his angels spirits, and his ministers a flame of fire.

    – God is that “Lord” who makes all.
    On the contrary, in Heb 1:2 Jesus is just a medium that God employs for “creating” the worlds, except for a recreating of the 2nd person.
    Since the person of “Son of God” died once, God re-creates the 2nd person again in order to exist.
    Heb 1:10
    And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands:
    Heb 1:2
    Hath in these last days spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the worlds;

    – God is immortal, whereas the person of “Son of God” died.
    God re-creates the 2nd person again in order to exist.
    Heb 1:12
    And as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail.

  13. Anonymous says:

    Now, herein is a question: who is a person whom David calls “my Lord” whilst he is not his son?

    The Biblical verses present a game-changing fact supporting the Unitarian arguments that actually certain angels from the rank of “Seraph” have a privilege to atone sins, such as that of Isaiah, and they are mortals (as they ought to cover their eyes from seeing God’s face). The same angel happens to atone the sins of Zechariah as well. Jude reveals that the Seraph is archangel whose name is Michael. The same angel appears to David who then falls down to venerate him without getting rebuked for doing so.
    Isa 6
    6 Then flew one of the seraphims unto me, having a live coal in his hand, which he had taken with the tongs from off the altar:7 And he laid it upon my mouth, and said, Lo, this hath touched thy lips; and thine iniquity is taken away, and thy sin purged.

    1Chr 21:16
    And David lifted up his eyes, and saw the angel of the LORD stand between the earth and the heaven, having a drawn sword in his hand stretched out over Jerusalem. Then David and the elders of Israel, who were clothed in sackcloth, fell upon their faces.

    Of course the Trinitarians can’t afford to believe that – due to his atoning powers – Jesus is one of mortal seraphim who ought to cover his eyes in order to avoid seeing God’s face.

  14. Anonymous says:

    Seraph means “burning one”, and Jesus happens to be illustrated as much as Seraph: a man whose eyes are as the flame of fire, and feet are as being burned in a furnace.
    Rev 1:14
    His head and his hairs were white like wool, as white as snow; and his eyes were as a flame of fire;15 And his feet like unto fine brass, as if they burned in a furnace; and his voice as the sound of many waters. 18 I am he that liveth, and was dead;

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